Five easy care indoor plants

I am in love with indoor plants. Not only are they interesting and fresh element, but also purify the air. What else can you ask for? I guess if they watered themselves, it’d be just perfect. However, not all of us live in one of those dream-like, Pinterest worthy houses: huge and full of enormous windows; with the soft breeze of spring caressing your skin and the light inundating the place like a silk veil. You know what I mean, right?

tough indoor plants

In real life, there are plants that won’t endure the lack of light, the excessive humidity of poorly ventilated places or the lack of thereof caused by air conditioning and heating. That’s why I’ve put together a list of really though plants that will endure any indoor environment: tiny studios in big citys, student dorm rooms, small flats with little light…

Let’s go!

Chamaedorea elegans

(Parlour palm)

chamaedorea

A small palm tree native from Mexico that fits in every corner and is extraordinarily easy to take care of. Direct sunlight doesn’t make it very happy, but it will tolerate various degrees of diffuse light (leaves will be darker or lighter according to the amount of light). With respect to water, it is better not to flood it. I water a bit when the soil starts to feel dry when I touch it. It also tolerates several degrees of humidity. Tough girl, this Mexican.

Maranta leuconeura var. Kerchoveana

(Prayer plant)

maranta

This plant comes from Brazil and its leaves are more beautiful than any flower. Its natural habitat is tropical, growing under the forest canopy, so no direct sunlight for it. Light must be diffuse and not excessive in order to maintain the spots on the leaves. It also requires high humidity (it’s tropical!) so, if you live in a dry place, the bathroom is going to be this plant’s favorite spot. And by the way, don’t get confused by the “tropical”: the soil must be humid, but never flooded.

Epipremmum aureum

(Photos)

epipremmum

The alpha and the omega of indoor houseplants. It comes from southeastern Asia. It can take almost everything. Water it thoroughly (but no flooding) when you notice the soil dry and voila. If there is too much light or direct sunlight, leaves will appear more pale, but in general, this plant is almost indestructible.

Spathiphyllum wallisii

(Peace lily)

spathiphyllum

This plant can grow up to a pretty big size, and has precious inflorescences that last for long. It grows better with a lot of diffuse light (no direct sunlight). It can tolerate darker spots, but it won’t flower. It’s not bothered by low air humidity, but we’ll have to water it a lot (no flooding!) when the soil starts to dry. What I like the most about this plant are its clear signs before drying out: its leaves will start to look droopy. Water it and wait a while until it’s fresh and lush again.

Monstera deliciosa

(Swiss cheese plant)

monstera

This Central American tropical plant is the queen of Pinterest. And I totally get it, those holey leaves are almost sexy. As this plant’s natural habitat is similar to the Maranta’s, its requirements are also similar: high humidity, moist, but not damped, soil; and low diffuse light. Monstera deliciosa. Yum.

These are the five plants I recommend, because they are tougher than Chuck Norris and have been tried and tested in my house for a long time, but there are many more. Do you know any more tough guys? Tell me!

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2 Comments

  1. Sunday July 10th, 2016
    Reply

    I love love your posts. I can read your real self in them.

    I like the Prayer plant, however, if I’m gonna put it in the bathroom because of its love for humidity and it sort of needs some diffuse light, what should I do? Change its spot from time to time? In the bathroom it´d only get the bright light from the halogen.

    Now I know what plants to buy for my dorm room in Birmingham! <3
    Thank you!

    • Eme
      Friday July 15th, 2016
      Reply

      Thanks a lot! Kind comments really encourage me to write more 😀

      In that case, I’d try to put it the nearest possible to the bathroom door, away from direct sunlight and I’d spray it daily with water (to recreate the typical “bathroom humidity”). Should be fine that way! 😉

      See you in the UK/Spain <3

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